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thoughts on the use of them domestically here in the united states. if you support their use for a wide variety of purposes, here is how you can give your support -- oppose their use 00 -- you can tweet us -- we had about 30 people chiming in before the start of the program. you could also send us an e- mail. it is the association of unmanned vehicle systems international. this story and convention is the featured story here on the front page of the wall"options and times" --ngton news" talks about their use in the united states and reaction to them -- that is the opinion on the use of drones in the united states. the topic for first half hour. we want to get your thoughts on their use. call on the line that best represents you and be prepared to tell us why. use, 202-t thethe us 585-381. out to how you can reach us. facebook.com available too. i see novans saying problems using them for military operations but do not think they should be used again surveillance -- civilians under any circumstances and they should not be allowed to be used for any individual to target another individual
divided voices weigh in on the best way to handle allegations of chemical weapons use in syria. >> waiting for the green light from the white house, the u.s. military says it is ready to launch a strike to weeken assad's regime. >> more than 60 square miles have been charred inside yosemite national park. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> that famous speech delivered by the reverend dr. martin luther king, jr. ♪ theme >> the u.n. special enjoy to syria wants to see the evidence the u.s. and its allies say they have concerning a chemical weapons attack in that nation. he spoke only one hour ago as the world awaits action on president bashar assad's regime. we've seen the images of the children and family suffering from symptoms similar to those caused by chemical weapons. the enjoy said the evidence does suggest some sort of chemical weapon was used, killing hundreds. >> i know that the americans and the british and others say that they know that chemical weapons have been used. what we have been told is that this evidence that the americans, the b
. and thanks to you at home for staying with us for the next hour. there is a lot going on in the news today. >>> we're going to start here in new york city where the united nations has today called an emergency session to convene the security council of the u.n. on an emergency basis late today to respond to what looks like it may have been the largest chemical weapons attack in the world since saddam hussein gassed his own people back in 1988. and looks like is the key phrase here. it's hard to prove. it is hard to tell conclusively when chemical weapons have been used especially if you are trying to tell from a distance. in that iraq case it took four years for experts to confirm that chemical weapons were, in fact, used then. physicians for human rights is one of the first groups to get into the site. they collected soil samples and tested them. the soil samples did show trace evidence of the elements that sarin gas breaks down into over time. and with those soil samples they were able to conclude that saddam hussein had used sarin and also mustard gas, like from world war i, mustard gas
in a time when there. demographicndous changes going on. the role of the u.s. in the world is in a different place. he is president. he is not a civil rights leader. he is the president of the entire country. his constituency is essentially everybody. king's constituency was those committed to civil rights in the issues he worked on. those are important differences. ability ofs, the president obama to be elected twice is a result of the sacrifices and struggles people carried on in the history of the country, not just in the civil rights movement, but the never forng fight for inclusion democratic participation. host: clarence lusane from american university talking about the march on washington and civil rights and 1964. today's coverage of the events in washington takes place on c- span. >> the speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy friends committee, a national legislation, and dr. michael chang. >> the day after martin luther king died, robert kennedy spoke on violence. here is what he said, what has violence accomplished and created? we tolerate a rising level of viole
. king inspire us with the "i have a dream" part of his speech, the part that was the call to action was the fierce urgency of now part of his speech. in that time dr. king says we refuse to take the tranquillity drug of gradualism. we must move forward, and forward we will. if it was fiercely then urgent, it certainly is now. 50 years ago there were only five african-american members of the house of representatives. there was no congressional black cauc caucus. today there are 43 members. we want more but there are 43. they're led by congresswoman marsha fudge who you heard from and they are the conscience of the congress. in that blauk caucus we have the privilege of serving with john lewis, some of us for over 25 years in the congress, and aren't we proud of that. i also want to mention that 50 years ago, though he was not a member of congress at the time that john conyers was one of three people invited to the white house to meet with president john f. kennedy following the civil rights march, the march for jobs, justice and freedom, who is with us. 50 years ago we had the first
'll hook you up. >>> thanks to you at home for staying with us the next hour. okay. when japanese pilots turned to kamikaze attacks in world war ii it was meant to not be only effective in a direct sense, but also terrifying. the piloted aircraft used as a missile could obviously do great direct damage to whatever it hit. the psychological effect of being up against an enemy who would do that, a military that would expect its own men to deliberately kill themselves, was also just meant to terrorize, to make their enemies believe there was nothing they wouldn't do, no lengths they would not go to. when iran and iraq went to war with each other in 1980, a war that stretched on for almost the full decade of the 1980s, the iranian side used human beings, masses of human beings to clear minefields, to walk out into mined areas, setting off the mines killing those people in the process but clearing for others to pass through the same area safely. they used swarms of humans often unarmed, untrained young boys to physically swarm over armed enemy positions. it was the human wave tactic. it was e
" with lawrence o'donnell. thanks for being with us tonight. have a great night. we'll be back with you tomorrow with steve schmidt. stay with us. >>> the phrasing has gone from little doubt to undeniable. syria and chemical weapons and what president obama is planning to do about it. >> the obama administration says there is very little doubt -- >> we believe there is very little doubt about culpability. >> the syrian government used chemical weapons. >> did a chemical weapons attack occur? >> what is before us today is real. >> the answer to that question is yes. >> president obama is weighing military options against syria. >> i have no affection for mr. assad. >> there is no solution as we have long made clear that includes assad. >> but at the same time i am less sure of the resistance. >> in that sense there's a big worry. >> should they let this chemical attack go unanswered? >> i do think action is going to occur. >> this morning a team of u.n. chemical weapons inspectors arrived in damascus. >> shots were fired at the u.n. team inside syria. >> their vehicle was deliberately shot at by
. will the united states use military force against that country and when? >> president obama is speaking out about syria. he said he's considering a military attack when he called a shot across syria. he wants to deter the use of chemical weapons. offer in his interview he also said he has not made a final decision. >> i have gotten options from our military, i had extensive discussion with our national security team. so let me talk about what's at stake here. we understand terrible things have been happening in syria for quite some time, that the assad regime there has been killing it's own people by the tens of thousands. there are sectarian arguments that have spilled over in bloodshed and escalated over the last couple of years. although what has happened there is tragic, and i have called for assad to leave and make sure that we've got a transitional government that could be inclusive in syria, what i've also concluded that direct military engagement involvement in the civil war in syria would not help the situation on the grouped. >> tonight the state department is criticizing what it calls
money back. >> we will look at how richmond, california is planning to use eminent domain to help fight the foreclosure crisis. we will speak to laura gottesdiener, author of the new book, "a dream foreclosed: black america and the fight for a place to call home." first, we look at the national security agency and the u.s. drug enforcement administration. dea agents are using intelligence gathered by the nsa to investigate americans and then being order to cover it up. all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. jeff bezos is buying the washington post, one of the leading newspapers in the country. the amazon.com founder and chief executive is one of the wealthiest people in the united states. he will pay $250 million for the post and a number of , less than one percent of his wealth, which is estimated at more than 28 billion dollars. he is a friend of donald graham, chief effective of the washington post company, whose family has owned the newspaper for eight decades. over the past the gate, the companies newspap
conferences and offering gavel- to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house all as a public service a public industry. created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago and funded your local cable or satellite provider and you go watch is in hd. x thousands of people gathered on the national mall today to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington and civil rights advocates joined members of government in a ceremony on the lincoln memorial. the same location where dr. martin luther king jr. delivered his i have a dream speech. you would hear from the reverend holder, then, eric reverend al sharpton, among others as a picture butte to the events of the day -- as they pay tribute to the events of the day. >> for those of us from the south, 50 years ago we received our marching orders when dr. martin luther king jr. quote it the prophet isaiah, i have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted and every hill should be made low and the crooked places will be made straight and the glory of the lord should be revealed and all flesh. and this is the faith that we go ba
watch dogs on protesters. it has only been months since the u.s. supreme court rolled back voting rights. every day in fact every 30 minutes a child is a victim of gun violence. so the whites only signs may be gone but there's still signs of injustice all around us. children born poor today are likely to stay poor. high poverty schools where kids need so much are given the least. and discrimination based on race or sexual orientation may no longer be legal, but it is still lethal. martin luther king jr. and others understood the intersection between racial equality and economic justice. the civil rights struggle is a struggle for good jobs and decent wages. and no while not the only solution they got, that educational opportunities is the highway to economic opportunity, which is why we must reclaim the promise of public education. and as i close, let me just say this, we stand here today as students, my friend and brother lee saunders, and myself, 50 years ago another gay person had to be in the shadows. but today i speak as a teacher, a worker, a labor activist, and a gay person deeply
of that king has called us all together once again to gather at the feet of the great emancipator just wonder from the granite figure of his father and one of our founding fathers. he has called us together not just to celebrate nor merely to commemorate. he has called us to fortify and inknock late our human spirit to galvanize and energyize our collective consciences to take action to realize the dream. he has been an elected leader, the president of a southern christian leader conference, the head of the martin luther king jr. center for nonviolent social change, the founder of realizing the dream. he is a national civil rights champion, a global human rights crusader. he is the father of yo landa renee, the husband of andrew waters, the big brother of dexter and bern niece, the younger brother of the late dwro landa denees. born of cortea scott king and the namesake of dr. martin luther king, jr., ladies and gentlemen, martin luther king iii. five decades ago, my father dr. martin luther king, jr., stood upon this hallowed spot. and the spirit of god spoke through him and summoned the nat
to the u.s. senate and the senate said, are you collecting data on minds of americans? he said, no. the very first sure he we did show they were collecting -- story we did showed they were collecting data. is ann, hasan rouhani upgraded as arends to president replacing mahmoud ahmadinejad. >> if you want the right response, don't stick with a ran in the language of -- don't speak with a ran. >> we will speak with trita parsi. all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration has announced it will keep 19 embassies in north africa and the middle east closed from to a week due to fears of a possible military threat. ramped up security measures were in place over the weekend that some of the 22 diplomatic posts shattered by the concerns. saxby chambliss, the top republican on the senate intelligence committee, said intercepted communications were reminiscent of what was heard before the 9/11 attacks. credited the nsa spy programs with detecting the threat. >> these programs are controversial. .
improved security measures at home and abroad to make sure we are focused on those who seek to do us harm. of course, not all threats result from terrorism or violent behavior. some come from mother nature and the impact can be just as severe if not more so. over the past 4.5 years, our nation has faced hundreds of disasters including hurricane irene which happens when multiple states were already doing with historic floods, making a bad situation even worse. we confronted deadly tornadoes in joplin, missouri, tuscaloosa, alabama, and moore, oklahoma. today, as we find ourselves every summer, we are fighting devastating wildfires in the western states, particularly california. as with our counterterrorism efforts, we two important lessons from each of these events, most notably -- we built upon the lessons of hurricane katrina to put us in the best possible position to support the response to a major hurricane and make sure that response would be fast, flexible, and comprehensive. we understood the importance of pre-positioning mass quantities of assets before the storm so they will be q
.c., event sponsored by the u.s. chamber of commerce. we take you to it now. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> klees be sure when you get the mic to identify yourself when the time comes. thank you. >> it is a pleasure to be here today. i'm glad all of you were able to make it with so much going on around the world. it seems that a little thing like the economy probably would not attract that much attention, so thank you for being here, and if i see you all run for the doors in the middle of this, i will know that something is biggern that is somewhat than what we are discussing here today. we're going to talk a little bit about the u.s. economy, where it has been, where we think it is going. and that a little bit about the labor markets sensitive labor day. when you look at the economy today, unfortunately what you see is an economy that now for four years has not been doing very much. we have grown at an average pace of 2.2%, as you can see from the chartered has not really been up or down. it was not as f
in syria as a response for the use of chemical weapons. president obama also speaking yesterday, saying he is still waiting operation -- us bill weighing options -- still weighing options. we want to hear from you about not only what was given, information wise, but if you are convinced by it. here is how you can weigh in this morning. republicans,for democrats,0 offor independents.or you can reach out to us on facebook, off of twitter, and at journal@c-span.org. it was a four-page document that was put out by the administration, showing some of the cases they are making as far as what they have found in syria. this is what was unclassified, not everything was put out there. you can also find this document at our website, c-span.org. a little bit from it -- also it says -- there is more to the document and the information that was given by the administration yesterday. kerry givingstate the case, we will show some of those clips as well during the course of our first 45 minutes together. for the information that was given on syria yesterday, we want to get your thoughts and if you were con
burnett anchors a cnn special investigation, "the truth about benghazi." >> tonight, u.s. embassies and consulates around the world close. >> we believe this threat is significant and we are taking it seriously. >> u.s. officials afraid of another benghazi, where four americans, including the u.s. ambassador to libya, were murdered. nearly a year later, no one wants to repeat the same fatal mistakes. >> my heart is broken, because he perished the way he did. >> the truth is irrefutable it was a terrorist attack. >> was it because of a protest or because of guys out for a walk one night that decided to kill some americans? what difference at this point does it make? >> was there a coverup? and where are the killers? >> they're either somewhere planning their next attack or they're hiding out. >> will there be justice? >> i'm afraid if these people are still in charge, more of our people are going to get murdered. >> tonight, from libya to washington, d.c., the truth about benghazi. ♪ >> good evening. i'm erin burnett. tonight, an "outfront" special investigation, the truth about be
reaction to the president using "the tonight show" as a forum to discuss serious issues. join us on facebook or send us a tweet, http://twitter.com/cspanwj and .-span hasbbc reporting yemen foiled an al qaeda plot to blow up oil pipelines and sees some of the country's main ports. the story was released a short while ago saying both u.s. and the uk have withdrawn diplomatic staff from yemen, prompted by intelligence reports over new terrorist activity. their u.s. is reported to send special operation forces for pop -- possible strikes against him and sites, al qaeda sites in yemen. the front page story about the september 11 benghazi attacks, charges have been filed, u.s. ambassador christie vince among those killed in that attack. we want to get to the president's comments last night on "the tonight show," asked about benghazi and terrorism and the shutdown of the u.s. embassies across north africa and the threat from aqap, which is al qaeda arabian peninsula. this is the president and jay leno. >> one thing i try to do as president is not overreact, but make sure as much as pos
that and more coming up on this hour of "markets now." ♪ good to have you with us here on monday. dagen is off on vacation this week, but we have a lot to talk about, brian westberry starting off on the economy. keep in mind, brian, he's been on a lot, and what he says, it's a plow horse economy, that's cue to do whatever you want to do, but he uses that phrase. we'll see how long it takes to get into it. after closing down for three straight weeks, the dow kicking off the week here higher. let's look at the markets now. lauren is on the floor today at the new york stock exchange. good morning. >> good morning. just as we started speaking, the dow industrials hitting fresh highs for the day. we don't have a huge move, but nudges, the biggest seen so far today. three green arrows across the board. facebook, they are hitting almost 42 a share right now, and so we'll see if we can get to 45. there's a lot of folks who bought facebook last may at $45 a share. that's powering techs higher today, and if you look at the dow industrials, the biggest gainer is home depot. that's a nearly 3% gain there,
that russia is sending two ships into the eastern mediterranean not far from u.s. vessels. >> investigators search a damascus suburb for chemical weapons a day before heading home. >> with international pressure mounting, whether the president will pull the trigger on syria. >> yosemite, how exhausted firefighters using sophisticated technology in their effort to detect new flames in that mammoth fire. >> a new kind of living for the budget minded, but not everyone is crazy about the trend. ♪ theme >> reports are out this morning that the russians are doing that year part to turn up pressure on the united states. reuters is saying that a military source within russia's intertax news agency claims a missile cruiser is being moved to the mediterranean. president obama has military options but has not decided whether to launch a military strike on occur i can't. obama's not likely to get u.n. approval and it appears britain is reigning in it's approval of a strike. the president said he has approved assad has responsibility for chemical attacks. a classified report will be delivered on the i
. >> for those of us who are from the south, 50 years ago we received our marching orders hen the prophet dr. king jr. quoted the prophet isiah, that have a dream. this is our hope. this is the faith that we go back to the south with. those are our marching orders. this is the faith that we go back to the south with. yes, the south where some are still trying to fight the civil war. yes, the south. where we are witnessing this vicious attack on voting rights and the blatant voter suppression by one particular political party. es, the south where young boys can't walk the street of his father's neighborhood without eing profiled, confronted, stalked, and finally murdered. watched over 45 days where governor because of the relentless protests of 20 plus,000 people reluctantly appointed a reluctant prosecutor who reluctantly put together a prosecuting team who did a poor job in presenting their case. watching a murderer go free, watching our community and our country try to go back 50 years . we walk away with the faith in the words of the prophet isiah once again that they that wait upon the l
is going to be very you can expect where democrats are in the majority, 54 of us, right, and where there was a willingness to get it done, do expect something out of the house of representatives that is better, from an ideological point of view, it will be more difficult. it is what i think. people, -- youe legalize people, they got to get a job, right, where there is healthcare. we know the american people to their health care through their employment, 80%. they will have more opportunities to get employment. their wages will increase, which means their ability to buy better food, to have a saner life, i mean, the stress that must be on those communities of people, the housing they have to live in. economic social and standards that will improve, but they will have to rely on emergency care because that was what was adopted in the senate. even though there is more than enough money saved according to cbo, instead of spending $45 billion over the next 10 years amount we spend $45 billion putting more control agents on the border. those are the decisions we are going to make. they a
use poison gas on its citizens and the u.s. will hold the assad regime accountable. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, after facing sniper fire, u.n. inspectors arrived at the site of the alleged chemical weapons attack in syria.. we have the latest on the investigation, and look at options on the table for a u.s. response. >> ifill: a massive wildfire near yosemite national park has engulfed more than 200 square miles, threatening key sources of water and power for the city of san francisco. jeffrey brown gets the latest on the dangerous blaze. >> woodruff: we continue our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by
. thanks to you at home for staying with us this hour. okay. this is laura poitress, an american filmmaker. she won a mccarther genius award last year. miss poitress makes documentaries. her first one was columbus, ohio, about gentryification in columbus, ohio. she's been working on a trilogy about the war in terror, starting with a documentary about life in iraq under u.s. control during the u.s. war in iraq. the second part tells the story of two men from yemen including one who was a driver for osama bin laden. miss potress is still working on the third installment in that trilogy which is about u.s. surveillance of phone calls and e-mails and so on since 9/11. she posted a bit of that one last year on "the new york times" website. >> build social networks for everybody. that turns into the graph then you index all that data to that graph which means you can pull out a community, that that gives you an outline of the life of everybody in the community. and if you carry it over time from 2001 up, you have that ten years worth of their life that you can lay out in a timeline that involves
we have a text in epidemic. how can we use the recent sensors and mapping and technologies that are available in robotics to have the car drive itself? that is moonshot thinking. maybe you can't get their right away. you have a mercury mission and then jim and i and apollo. it's about a year. this is the prototype, isabel for the glass designer. by the way for the prototype, the first prototype they built they did it not in a month but a year-and-a-half they put it together. why couldn't school be like that, but set apart and do the design thinking then we start projects and businesses? we think 10x better, not 10%. when we are working with something two-thirds what can i do to move forward in what is the critique? a third, yes. this is a place we just wanted people to celebrate moonshot thinking. also looking more historical yet who already made it but let's celebrate the people taking decrease the risk. hear the proposals and help them to try to move the world for word and moonshot radical proposals. last i guess i would end on - it's so important to help kids find their
mason university in virginia. you can reach him on twitter. thanks for being with us this morning and talking about eminent domain. that will do it for this "orning's washington journal next, we will take you live to the national press club where they will be recognizing out going homeland security secretary jenna not a ton of who is stepping down from her position, taking the chair as president of the university of california. live coverage is next on c-span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] the shift to [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we are live at the national press club in washington, dc awaiting remarks from out going homeland security department secretary janet napolitano. earlier this summer, she announced she would be stepping down from her cap in a position to become president of the university of california system which includes ucla and the university of california berkeley among other campuses this is. we are expecting her in a moment. >> ladies and gentlemen, we will start into moments of silence all cell phones
for a strike. u.s. secretary of state john kerry and president barack obama making the case to take action yesterday. we're covering every angle of the crisis in syria. barbara starr at the pentagon, jill dougherty at the white house, nick payton wash at the united nations in new york and fred pleitgen joining us from beirut, lebanon. let's begin at the pentagon. barbara, what moves has the military already made to get in place for any possible strikes? >> well, fred, by all accounts everything is in place. it's simply awaiting a decision from the president to execute an order to strike. there are still five u.s. navy warships in the eastern mediterranean, about 40 tomahawk cruise missiles on each of them. these are very precise weapons guided to their preplanned targets by satellite coordinates, 1,000-pound warheads on them, so very lethal. the target list, by all accounts, will include command and control centers, regime elements, weapons delivery systems areas, that sort of thing. anything they can get after that they can tie to potential chemical weapons attack or the regime itself and
the u.s. have in the region? >> we violated our own rule of law by not calling it for what it is because our law clearly states that if it's a military coup then aid is cut off. they had the coup and we didn't do that. that's a blow to credibility. amy: the attorney general takes aim at those con victed of minor drug offenses. >> certain low level nonviolent drug offenders who have no ties to large scale organizations, gangs or cartels, will no longer be charged with offenses that impose draconian mandatory minimum sentences. amy: and hillary clinton laying the groundwork for 2016. >> many americans are asking how do we ensure that the law continues to serve and belong to the people in a time when ideology and gridlock have paralyzed our politics? amy: but is this man conceding anything? covering the week, indira lakshmanan on bloomberg news. pete williams of nbc news. and jeff zeleny of abc news. >> award winning reporting and analysis and covering heft as it happens live from our nation's capital this is "washington week." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we
and mitch the senate republican lear mitch mcconnell. it was held at u.s. capitol. here's a portion of the event that runs just under an hour. we are back live at 11:00 eastern time with the ceremony on the mall on the steps of the lincoln memorial. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable nancy pelosi. >> good afternoon. thank you for bringing us together for this congressional bipartisan observance of the 50 year anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to ac
the story is saying? >> i don't see any reason.not see any there is no evidence that rebels had used chemical weapons or have access to the delivery systems required to carry out the attacks we saw on august 21. >> it appears sources in your government are saying -- talk to us anonymously all the time. what you say when i -- that you place more credibility in on- record statements. that is all i am directing you to write now. >> in light of the anonymous sources that are in your government, what they are saying, they do not know where some of these weapons are, does jay carney's statement still hold that you do know? what we will say is have said before, which is we have not seen credible evidence or credible reports that the opposition has used chemical weapons or that they have the capability of using the kind of chemical weapons that we saw used in an attack outside damascus on august 21. hasou also said that syria not lost control or had been overrun in any way, or that the chemical stockpiles had been overrun in any way? >> i see no reason to differ with that. attack chemical we
of justice's blocked merger of american and u.s. air ways. ahead, north carolina chamber of commerce with why her state is putting up a fight. lori: donald trump a fraud, why he's sued, and what he calls taking advantage of student, and what legal council is telling fox business. we have more breaking news coming up. adam: expecting winter, cold, what did you think i was going to say? dire predictions, arctic blast expected to return with a vengeance. time for stocks, going to the floor every 15 minutes. lauren is there this morning, and the dow is up, not dramatically, despite bad news with durable goods order. >> yes, and another four-letter word for you, "slow." that's the volume here at the stock exchange, and the dow's up, s&p's up a quarter percent each. the nasdaq is the out performer here, but you're right, the durable goods trend for the month of july out an hour before the market opened this morning with a huge disappointment, down 7.3%, like a one-two punch when you take intoing the friday's disappointing numbers and nine-month low for new home sales and the durable goods report, p
not be available to the u.s. and mentioned the fact that the u.s. is wary of war. the american public is weary of war. again, on the call as you mentioned. representatives from the state department, pentagon, and all intelligence agencies. >> is there any kind of press or action that the president was considering? >> john, the general consensus is that this action would be really without precedent. that the u.s. has never attacked another country for using chemical weapons. president obama said it wouldn't be regime change or changing the civil war. instead, it would be a war in syria against using chemical weapons again. we know they maintain stock piles and we indicated from this podium and other places over the course of the last two years that the regime will be held accountable for the security of those chemical weapons. >> but experts say it is a stretch for the president to say attacking syria is somehow about keeping america safe. >> the only way that the president can legally strike syria is somehow related it to america's defense. quite frankly, i think he is making a pretty tenuous
, children, all of them dead. syrian leaders, however, continued to deny using chemical weapons this morning and faced with reports of u.s. strikes that could come as early as thursday, according to u.s. officials. syria also stressed it can defend itself using all available means. still, no formal decision has been announced regarding a u.s. military response. the u.n. chemical weapons team when visited the site of the alleged chemical attack yesterday said it's not too late to collect and analyze the evidence and is expected to resume inspections tomorrow. u.s. officials say they do not need to wait for a u.n. report before taking action. joining me today, politics editor for "business insider, "josh barrow. peter binart, "daily beast" editor and "washington post" columnist and msnbc contributor jonathan capehart, and senior editor for "the atlantic," and former fellow on the press. and diplomatic correspondent for the "washington post," ann guerin. and joining us from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent amman mojadin. when we look at the rising crescendo of a potential strike as early a
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